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NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



S. P. Lees Colleaiate Institute 



OF 



CENTRAL UNIVERSITY 



JACKSON, KENTUCKY, 
1899=1900. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1900-1901. 



LEX, REX— CRUX, LUX. 



COMMENCEMENT MAY 30, 1899. 



SERMON. 

Rev. Harvey Glass, D. D., Somerset, Ky. 

graduates. 

Mr. Seldon Hargis, 
Miss Margaret Sewell- 

medalists. 

Declamation, February 22 Samuel Young. 

Recitation, February 22 , . . Dora Blanton. 

Declamation, May 30 Floyd Craft. 

Recitation, May 30 Sallie Hieronymus. 

First Year Latin Beach Hargis. 

Bible Belva Short. 

Common School Branches Arthur Shackelford. 

M USI C (two Medals of Equal Grade) . . j ^SSSS^SS^ 

calendar, 1900-1901. 

September 4, Tuesday Beginning of First Term. 

December 4, Tuesday Beginning of Second Term. 

March 5, Tuesday Beginning of Third Term. 

May 26, Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon. 

May 27, Monday Commencement Exercises. 

holidays. 

November 29, Thursday Thanksgiving. 

December 25 to January i Christmas Vacation. 

February 22, Friday Washington's Birthday. 

April 2, Tuesday Arbor Day. 



THE S. P. I,EES COtTvEGlATE INSTITUTE. 



THE S. P. I^^ COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 



L. H. BLANTON, D. D., Chancellor. 



FACULTY. 



WM. DINWIDDIE, M. A., PRESIDENT, 

Bible, Latin, English. 

J. G. VENABLE, A. B., 

Latin, English, Mathematics. 

J. F. LUKENS, A. M., 

Normal Depart jnent. 

MIvSS KATE L. CLARK, 

Intermedia te Depart)ne7it. 

MISS ANNIE L. IRVINE, 

Primary Department. 

MISS KATHERINE BLANTON, 

Assistant in Primary and Intermediate. 

MISS MARGARET GLASS, 

Music. 

MISS ELIZABETH GLASS, 

Assistant in Music. 

MISS CORA E. POWER, 

Stenography and Penmanship. 

MR. EDWIN C EVANS, 

Manual Training and Drawing. 

MISS M. G. MAYFIELD, I. B., 

Domestic Science and History. 

MISS M. P. IRVINE, 

Matron. 

MISS MINNIE L. DAY, 

McCormick Chapel School. 



THE) S. P. I.EES COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



For the Session of 1899-1900. 



Back, America 
Back, Angeline 
Blanton, Dora 
Bowman, Alice 
Bowman, Calla 
Campbell, William 
Carpenter, Gilian 
Carpenter, Lilian 
Combs, Henry 
Combs, Nettie 
Cope, William 
Craft, Elliott 
Crawford, Laura 
Cundiff, Alex. 
Gambill, Chas. 

Total 



Allen, Carroll 
Back, America 
Back, Everett 
Back, Farish 
Back, Reese 
Beatty, Milward 
Bradley, America 
Bradley, Arzanus 
Bullock, Dora 
Byrd, Richard 
Callahan, Ellen 
Carpenter, Adam 
Carpenter, Gilian 
Chapman, Clay 
Combs, Chester 
Combs, Henry 
Combs, Willie 
Crawford, Laura 

Total 



Gillam, Jemima 
Hagins, Fleet 
Hagins, Kenton 
Holbrook, Tinsley 
Hollon, James 
Hurst, Fannie 
Hurst, Taylor 
Jett, John 
Johnson, Mary 
Keith, Louisa 
Landrnm, Joseph 
Lewis, Mary 
Maloney, Mollie 
Mann, Kelly 
Maun, Noah 



COLLEGIATE. 

Davis, John 
Davis, Myfanwy 
Day, Luther 
Eversole, Roscoe 
Eweu, Clifton 
Fields, Mollie 
Griffith, Harlan 
Hagins, Kenton 
Hagins, Oscar 
Hargis, Beach 
Heusley, Clara 
Johnson, Frances 
Keith, Louisa 
Kelley, Blanche 
Kelley, Clara 
Lewis, Mary 
Mann, Kelly 



Maupin, Dora 
Moore, Cora 
Noble, George 
Noble, Solomon 
Oney, Callie 
Power, John 
Risner, Bruce 
Roberts, Delania 
Shepherd, Green 
Short, Belva 
Strong, William 
Terry, Artemisia 
White, Hattie 
William, Kash 

. .44 

Marcum, Nellie 
Marcum, Tom 
Metzger, Louis 
Patrick, Charlena 
Phillips, Elmer 
Runyon, Naomi 
Russell, Alfred 
Sewell, Kate 
Short, Belva 
Spencer, Herbert 
Strong, Kash 
Taylor, William 
Troy, Pearl 
Wallin, Curtis 
Whipkey, Isodel 
White, Sarah 
Wiremau, Georgia 



52 



THE vS. P. IvEES COI^EGIATE INSTITUTE. 



Back, Grannis 
Back, Jennie 
Back, Seldon 
Blanton, Cora 
Blanton, Grover 
Bolin, Pearly 
Bowman, Lela 
Brophy, Joseph 
Browning, Edna 
Browning, Margaret 
Bullock, Ethel 
Cockerham, Harvey 
Combs, Wilgus 
Cope, Archie 
Cope, Fred 
Crawford, Emma 
Crawford, Maggie 
Cundiff, Bruce 
Davis, Flossie 
Davis, Gracie 
Davis, Richard 

Total 



INTERMEDIATE. 

Day, Golden 
Day, May 
Ewen, Cora 
Gum, Robert 
Hagins, Lula 
Hall, Jettie 
Hall, Mary 
Hargis, Evalee 
Hays, Julia 
Herald, Richard 
Hurst, Lily 
Jackson, Winnie 
Johnson, James 
Landrum, Cora 
Little, Eliza 
Lyon, Carrie 
Lyon, Eugene 
Lyon, Willie 
Mann, Thomas 
Mitchell, Lily 
Mitchell, Thomas 



Orear, Fannie 
Osborne, Ida 
Power, Ann 
Risner, Willie 
Rose, Nannie 
Runyon, Sterling 
Sewell, Ben. 
Sewell, May 
Short, Blaine 
Short, Dan 
Short, Dora 
Short, Kitty 
Smith, Willie 
Terrill, Dora 
Thompson. Jessie 
Turner, Nellie 
Wallin, Edgar 
Whipkey, Mary 
Whipkey, Rubeth 
Williams, Sue 

. . 62 



Atchison, Kelly 
Back, Cora 
Back, Evalice 
Back, Herschel 
Back, Kelly 
Back, Mollie 
Blanton, Bertie 
Blanton, Harrison 
Brophy, Winifred 
Callahan, Ellen 
Callahan, Lily 
Callahan, Wilson 
Clark, John 
Clark, Myrtice 
Clark, Thomas 
Cockrill, Samuel 
Cole, Leonard 



PRIMARY. 

Cole, Lewis 
Collier, Josie 
Combs, Wiley 
Cope, Lizzie 
Cope, Robert 
Crawford, Pierce 
Dailey, Claude 
Dailey, Lucile 
Davis, Gipsy 
Davis, Violet 
Day, Margaret 
Ewen, Bruce 
Ewen, Mattie 
Gose, Dorsey 
Gose, Lizzie 
Gose, Morton 
Hagins, Otie 



Hall, John 
Hargis, Thomas 
Harrison, Bessie 
Hoskins, Bertha 
Hoskins, Kelly 
Hurst, Samuel 
Hurst, Myrtle 
Hutchins, Hugh 
Jackson, Abbie 
Kelman, Rachel 
Kelmau, Rosa 
Lyon, Addie 
Lyon, Samuel 
Mann, Saul 
Mann, Susie 
Marcum, Alfred 
Marcum, Imogene 



s 



THE S. P. I<EES COI^EGIATE INSTITUTE. 



Osborne, Carl 
Patrick, Alfred 
Patrick, Gertrude 
Patton, Jessie 
Patton, Roy 
Sewell, Nancy 
Short, Cox 



Short, Lily 
Smith, Gracie 
Smith, Willie 
Stamper, Dicie 
Sturdivant, Robert 
Swope, Mary 



Taulbee, Mary 
Taulbee, Ruth 
Wallin, Nettie 
Webb, Pearlie 
Whipkey, Emma 
Williams, Lucy 



Total 70 



Atchison, Ida 
Callahan, Ellen 
Callahan, Lily 
Callahan, Lou Ellen 
Carpenter, Lilian 
Cope, Bettie 
Crawford, Maggie 
Davis, Myfanwy 
Day, Golden 
Day, May 
Hargis, Evalee 

Total 



Atchison, Nannie 
Hensley, Clara 



MUSIC. 
Hurst, Fannie 
Hurst, Lily 
Jackson, Winnie 
Johnson, Ada 
Kelman, Rachel 
Kelman, Rosa 
Lyon, Addie 
Lyon, Carrie 
Marcuni, Imogene 
Marcum, Nellie 
Mills, Mrs. H. R. 

BUSINESS. 

Metzger, Louis 



Total 



Patrick, Charlena 
Patrick, Gertrude 
Power, Ann 
Rose, Nannie 
Sewell, Kate 
Sewell, Lucy 
Sewell, Margaret 
Thompson, Jessie 
Troy, Pearl 
Whipkey, Isodel 

• • 32 

Patrick, Florence 
. . 4 



Allen, Carroll 
Back, Everett 
Back, Farish 
Back, Seldon 
Cole, Lewis 
Combs, Chester 
Combs, Wilgus 
Combs, Willie 
Cope, Archie 
Cope, Fred 
Cundiff, Alex. 
Cuncliff, Bruce 
Davis, John 
Davis, Richard 



MANUAL TRAINING. 

Day, Luther 
Eversole, Roscoe 
Ewen, Bruce 
Ewen, Clifton 
Gose, Morton 
Gum, Robert 
Hagins, Oscar 
Hargis, Beach 
Herald, Richard 
Hoskins, Kelly 
Hurst, Samuel 
Landrum, Joseph 
Lyon, Eugene 
Lyon, Willie 



Total 



Mann, Kelly 
Mann, Noah 
Marcum, Tom 
Metzger, Louis 
Phillips, Elmer 
Runyon, Sterling 
Sewell, Ben 
Short, Blaine 
Short, Dan 
Spencer, Herbert 
Strong, Kash 
Taylor, William 
Wallin, Curtis 
Wallin, Edgar 
. . 42 




MRS. S. P. LEES. 



10 



THE S. P. I,EES COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 



Back, America 
Back, Cora 
Back, Jennie 
Beatty, Milward 
Blanton, Dora 
Bowman, Alice 
Bowman, Calla 
Bowman, Lela 
Browning, Edna 
Browning, Margaret 
Bullock, Dora 
Callahan, Ellen 
Callahan, Lily 
Carpenter, Giliari 
Collier, Josie 
Combs, Nettie 
Cope, Lizzie 
Crawford, Emma 
Crawford, Laura 
Crawford, Maggie 
Davis, Flossie 
Davis, Gracie 
Davis, Myfauwy 
Davis, Violet 
Day, Golden 
Day, May 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

{Institute. ) 
Ewen, Cora 
Ewen, Mattie 
Fields, Mollie 
Gose, Lizzie 
Hagins, Lula 
Hall, Jettie 
Hall, Mary 
Hargis, Evalee 
Hays, Julia 
Hensley, Clara 
Hj^ii, Fannie 
Httrit:, Lily 
Jackson, Abbie 
Jackson, Winnie 
Johnson, Frances 
Johnson, Mary 
Kelley, Blanche 
f^JCelley, Clara 
Lewis, Mary 
Little, Eliza 
Lyon, Addie 
Lyon, Carrie 
Malouey, Mollie 
Mann, Susie 
Marcum, Nellie 



Mitchell, Lily 
Orear, Fannie 
Osborne, Ida 
Patrick, Charlena 
Patrick, Florence 
Patrick, Gertrude 
Power, Ann 
Rose, Nannie 
Runyon, Naomi 
Sewell, Kate 
Sewell, May 
Sewell, Nancy 
Short, Belva 
Short, Dora 
Short, Kitty 
Swope, Mary 
Terry, Artemisia 
Thompson, Jessie 
Turner, Nellie 
Whipkey, Isodel 
Whipkey, Mary 
Whipkey, Rubeth 
White, Sarah 
Williams, Lucy 
Williams, Sue 



Total (in Institute) 76 



Anderson, Mary 
back, Deema 
Back, Sarah 
Bowman, Lily 
Bryant, Nannie 
Cardwell, Evora 
Edwards, Elvira 



{McCormick Chapel.) 
Edwards, Mary 
Ellington, Martha 
Farthing, Bertie 
Finn, Maggie 
Flinchem, Belva 
Grigsby, Canzala 
Hays, Cora 



Total . . . 
In Institute 



Hays, Lydia 
Hoskins, Myrtle 
Huff, Dora 
McDaniel, Sarah 
Miller, Rebecca 
Moore, Tely 
Sally, Mollie 
. . 21 
. .76 



Total in Domestic Science . 97 



THE S. P. I.EES COI^EGIATE INSTITUTE. 



II 



McCORMICK CHAPEL SCHOOL. 

Acres, Beulah Davidson, Willie McDaniel, Chester 

Allen, Armina Davis, Arthur McDaniel, Sarah 

Anderson, Mary Davis, Maud McDaniel, Willie 

Back, Alexander Davis, Minnie Mcintosh, John 

Back, Cora Edwards, Edward Manus, Cuida 

Back, Deema Edwards, Elvira Manus, Dora 

Back, Sadie Edwards, Eva Manus, John 

Back, Willie Edwards, Gertrude Manus, Maggie 

Belcher, John Edwards, Jerry Messer, Clarence 

Bowman, L,ily Edwards, Mary Messer, John 

Bryant, Hugh Ellington, Martha Messer, Preston 

Bryant, James Farthing, Bertie Messer, Sullivan 

Bryant, Maud Farthing, Oscar Messer, Tabitha 

Bryant, Nannie Finn, Maggie Miller, Jimmie 

Cardwell, Evora Flinchem, Belva Miller, Rebecca 

Carpenter, Delia Flinchem, Charles Miller, Wilburn 

Carpenter, Dora Grigsby, Canzala Moore, Allen 

Carpenter, Eddie Grigsby, Jane Moore, Edward 

Carpenter, Morton Grigsby, Marion Moore, Tely 

Chaney, Edward Hall, Roy Puckett, Claude 

Childers, Blair Harvey, Emily Puckett, Edward 

Childers, Eugene Harvey, William Rawly, Bentley 

Childers, Jay Hays, Cora Rawly, Jane 

Childers, Price Hays, Kate Rawly, Mahaly 

Clark, Emma Hays, Julia Runyon, Ernest 

Colley, Warren Hays, L,iddie Runyon, Robert 

Collins, Bertha Hays, Roy Russell, Cora 

Collins, Charles Hoskins, Bessie Russell, Hop 

Collins, Eliza Hoskins, Myrtle Russell, James 

Collins, Nellie Howard, Dorcas Sally, Bessie 

Collins, Robert Huff, Dan Sally, Edgar 

Combs, Alice Huff, Dora Sally, Mollie 

Cox, Ida Hutchinson, Hugh Strong, Cosby 

Cox, Odie Jones, Roland Tate, Myrtie 

Darby, Austin Ketchum, Edgar Walsh, Eddie 

Darby, Warren Ketchum, Leonard York, Minnie 

Davidson, Bruce Ketchum, Letitia 

Total no 

SUMMARY. 

Total attendance, Institute, without duplicating 227 

Total attendance, McCormick Chapel School no 

Total attendance for the whole institution 337 



12 THE S. P. LEES COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 



LOCATION. 

Jackson, the county seat of Breathitt county, health- 
fully situated on high ground on the North Fork of the Ken- 
tucky river, is a central point in the mountain region. 
Easy communication with the larger cities is afforded by 
means of the Lexington & Eastern Railway. 

The people are heartily in sympathy with the work of 
the school, and give both students and teachers hospitable 
welcome to their homes. A no less cordial invitation is 
extended by the churches, and many of the students attend 
the services and take part in the work of the young peo- 
ple's societies. 

PROGRESS. 

About fifteen years ago the Jackson Academy was estab- 
lished. In 1897 were completed the great improvements 
to the buildings and equipment rendered possible by the 
generosity of Mrs. S. P. Lees, Mrs. N. F. McCormick and 
other friends. In honor of Mrs. Lees the name was then 
changed to " The S. P. Lees Collegiate Institute." 

The present session has seen other notable additions to 
the work, in the equipment by Mrs. McCormick of the new 
departments of Manual Training and Domestic Science, 
the establishment of an electric light plant, the erection of 
the McCormick Chapel and the opening of the McCormick 
Free School. 

Material progress has been accompanied by steady 
growth in attendance and influence until the Institute is 
now esteemed to be one of the most potent factors in the 
educational and moral advancement of the whole mountain 
region. All but two or three of the eighty teachers of 
Breathitt county were educated in the Institute. 

The present session has been one of remarkable pros- 
perity. The attendance, including the newly opened 



14 THE S. P. I,EES COU,EGlATE INSTITUTE. 

school of more than ioo pupils of the McCormick Chapel, 
is over 330, the enrollment of the Institute alone exceeding 
225, an increase of about 30 over the total for the preceding 
session. The behavior of the large student body has been 
excellent, not one serious case of discipline having occurred 
during the entire session. 



EQUIPMENT. 

A large and handsome school building, containing a 
chapel seating 400, seven recitation rooms, two society halls, 
office and library; two dormitories, one heated by furnace for 
girls, the other for boys; an electric light plant ; a manual 
training shop furnished with tools, lathes, drill, fret-saw, 
forge, etc. ; a sewing-room with cutting-out tables and 
sewing machines ; a cooking-room with an ample outfit — 
this, in brief, constitutes the material equipment of the 
Institute. 

Ample grounds, affording space for ball, tennis and 
other outdoor games, surround the buildings. 



ORGANIZATION. 

I. The Institute proper, embracing Primary, Interme- 
diate and Collegiate grades, and Normal, Business and 
Music departments. 

II. The McCormick School of Manual Training and 
Domestic Science, w T hich comprises two distinct depart- 
ments : 

1st. Manual Training, including instruction in Draw- 
ing, Woodwork, Forging and Machinery. 

2d, Domestic Science, with classes in Sewing, Cooking 
and Dietetics. 

III. The Boarding Department. 

IV. The McCormick Chapel and Free School. 



THE S. P. I,EES COI<I<EGIATE INSTITUTE. 15 



» FACULTY. 

The educational work is in charge of twelve com- 
petent teachers, trained at the University of Virginia, Cen- 
tral University, Ohio University, South Carolina College 
for Women, Pratt Institute, Iyouisville Manual Training 
High School, Syracuse City Schools, and elsewhere. Many 
of these teachers have had years of successful experience 
in their chosen profession. The departments of Manual 
Training and Domestic Science are under the care of spe- 
cialists. The smoothness with which the work is carried 
on, and the general commendation which it receives from 
a wide circle of patrons and friends are sufficient indica- 
tion of its character, and consequently of the ability of 
the corps of instructors. 



l6 THE S. P. LEES COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



The selection of a course of study, or any change in a 
course once selected, is subject to the approval of the Fac- 
ulty. The courses are arranged so as to afford the best 
preparation for college, for business and for the profes- 
sions. 

PRIMARY. 

Moses' Phonic Speller; Cyr's Primer; Baldwin's and 
Nature Readers ; Long's Home Geography ; Prince's Arith- 
metic ; Long's Language Lessons; Zaner's System of 
Writing; Oral Nature Study; Bible Leaflets; Calisthenics. 

INTERMEDIATE. 

Baldwin's Readers ; Stories from English History; Nat- 
ural Speller ; Zaner's Combined Movement System of Pen- 
manship ; Milne's Arithmetics; Redway's Geographies; 
Metcalf s Language ; Swinton's Grammar ; Eggleston's 
United States History ; Bible Leaflets. 

COLLEGIATE. 

First Year — Harvey's Grammar; Milne's Standard 
Arithmetic; Milne's Algebra; Montgomery's American 
History ; Nile's Advanced Geography ; Collar and Daniell's 
First Latin Book ; Reading in Standard Authors ; Lectures 
on Bible ; Spelling ; Penmanship. 

Second Year — Williams' Rhetoric; Milne's Algebra; 
Milne's Geometry; Montgomery's English History; Macy's 
Our Government ; Collar's Latin Composition ; Selections 
from Nepos, Caesar, Cicero; Lectures on Science ; Lectures 
on Bible. 

Third Year — Painter's Literature; Milne's Geometry; 
Well's Trigonometry; Myer's General History; Bennett's 






NORMAL CLASS. 


















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MUSIC CLASS. 




DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. 



l8 THE S. P. LEES COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 

Latin Grammar and Composition; Cicero; Virgil; Livy; 
Lectures on Science; Lectures on Bible; French; German; 
Greek. 

Completion of the above course entitles the student to 
a diploma from Central University as graduate of S. P. 
Lees Collegiate Institute. More advanced courses can be 
given to those who wish them. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE. 

In view of the notable expansion of instruction in 
Science rendered possible by the generous aid of Mr. Stanley 
McCormick in providing the necessary apparatus, a detailed 
account of the work seems proper. 

The aim will be to give the student a thorough grounding 
in the principles of the Natural Sciences, and so far as pos- 
sible to offer opportunity for each, by personal experiment, 
to make applications and tests of these principles. The 
desire is to form in the student the habit of reading the 
open book of nature, and thus to cultivate the powers of 
observation and discrimination and to teach the lessons 
of the beauty and order in the world around us. 

The following distinct courses are offered : 

I. Chemistry, the science of matter and its combina- 
tions, embracing Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. 

II. Physics, the science of energy, including exposi- 
tions and experiments in Mechanics, Sound, Heat, Light 
and Electricity. 

III. Geology, the study of the earth and its history as 
a planet, with interesting suggestions as to the influence of 
geological change on man. 

IV. Biology, the science of animate nature, including 
Botany, Zoology and Physiology. 

V. Astronomy, the science of the stars, with especial 
reference to the laws of planetary motion and related 
phenomena. 

It is, perhaps, true that no other branch of study so 



THE: S. P. I,EES COIXEGIATE INSTITUTE. 19 

widens the mental horizon, or opens so many new avenues 
of thought as the study of Science. The various courses 
outlined above will be taught with a view to securing this 
beneficent result along with the unquestionable advantages 
flowing from the work of the other departments. 

As it is desired to select a new set of text-books meeting 
the demands of this course, the announcement of these is 
withheld for the present. 

NORMAL. 

The Normal work constitutes a distinct department, and 
is in charge of a teacher of specific training and long 
experience. Every effort is made to offer a course meeting 
fully the needs of the teachers of Eastern Kentucky. The 
subjects and books are as follows . 

Arithmetic, Milne's Standard; Geography, Nile's Ad- 
vanced; Government, Peterman; Grammar, Harvey; United 
States History, Montgomery ; Kentucky History, Smith ; 
Pedagogy, Page's Theory and Practice; Penmanship; Za- 
ner's Combined Movement System ; Physiology, Brown ; 
Speller, Natural ; Bible. 

Normal students have the privilege of attending such 
classes in other departments as do not interfere with their 
special work. The course, however, is complete in itself, 
and outside work can be taken only by substituting it for 
some part of the Normal. The classes in Manual Train- 
ing and Domestic Science, however, do not conflict with 
the regular normal work, and may be taken in connection 
with a full Normal course without extra charge. 

BUSINESS. 

The work of this department may be combined with 
that of the other departments. The branches of study 
taught exclusively in this course are Bookkeeping, Ste- 
nography and Typewriting. The system of shorthand 
used is the Pitman. The Smith Premier typewriter is the 
machine at present employed. This department is in 



20 THE S. P. LEES COU,EGIATE INSTITUTE. 

charge of a thoroughly competent teacher of stenography, 
and the success of the students has been remarkable. 

Commercial Arithmetic, Commercial Geography, Busi- 
ness, Penmanship, etc., are taught in the regular aca- 
demic classes of the Institute. 

MUSIC. 

The department of Music is in charge of a teacher of 
distinguished musical talent and of painstaking diligence. 
Her assistant also is gifted and conscientious in her work. 

Both the instrumental and the vocal courses are given 
the most careful attention. There are two lessons a week 
in each. Piano students are allowed as many periods of 
practice as their time and number will admit. The depart- 
ment has now three pianos. 

The results of the faithful work in this department are 
shown by the largely increased enrollment of musical stu- 
dents and the evident excellence of their training. 

THE McCORMICK SCHOOL OF MANUAL TRAINING 
AND DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

This school, just added to the work of the Institute, is 
the first of its kind in this part of the State, and, excepting 
the Louisville school, about the only one in Kentucky. 
The great importance of this work as a factor in education 
needs no proof; it is beyond question. The value of such 
courses in the direction of higher academic work is shown 
by their evident popularity. 

The instruction in each department is in charge of a 
specialist. 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

The Manual Training shop is fitted with modern tools 
and machines, and is equipped for an excellent course in 
woodwork, forging and machinery. The aim is not to 
make full-fledged mechanics, but to give a practical training 
in the use of tools and machinery, and at the same time to 




MANUAL TRAINING CLASS. 




THE C. J. LITTLE HALL. 



22 THE S. P. I,EES COIXEGTATE INSTITUTE- 

inculcate the important lesson of the vital relation of think- 
ing to doing. This is accomplished by requiring every 
student to plan each piece of work and to make an accurate 
drawing of his plan before a tool is touched. He thus 
learns the great economy of the work of the brain as a 
preparation for the work of the hand. 

The course begins with instruction in drawing, that 
each pupil may have his own drawing as a test of the accu- 
racy of his work. Easy exercises in the joinery work of 
cabinet-making are taken up, and, along with this, instruc- 
tion is given in the proper handling and care of tools. 

The structure and use of the lathe is thoroughly taught, 
the use of the various turning tools and the best methods 
of making the different cuts. 

If time allows, talks are given on the designing of pat- 
terns, and lessons in wood-carving to those who may desire 
to learn this beautiful branch of woodwork. 

After the elementary exercise work is finished satisfac- 
torily, the student is allowed to make pieces of furniture, 
such as hat-racks, desks, tables, etc. 

The shop is lighted by electricity from a dynamo run 
by the gasoline engine, which also furnishes the power for 
the lathes, fret-saw, drill and grindstone. Each work- 
bench, each lathe and every other machine in the shop has 
an individual light, a feature not often found even in the 
best schools of the kind. The lamp for the instructor's 
bench is guarded by a polished aluminum shade so as to 
throw the light directly on the blackboard, and not in the 
faces of the class. The students are thus enabled to see 
distinctly the lines and figures of the model drawings. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

The aim of the instruction in this department is to give 
a scientific and practical knowledge of woman's work in 
the home. The teaching follows the two chief lines of 
household work, Sewing and Cooking. 



THE S. P. I<KKS COIJ^EGIATE INSTITUTE. 23 

The sewing-room is large, well-lighted and furnished 
with individual tables, new sewing-machines and a full 
supply of the necessaries of the work. 

The course covers two years, as follows : 

First Year — First term : Sample work illustrating the 
different stitches and the use of each. Second term : Plain 
sewing on machine, draughting, cutting and fitting of gar- 
ments. Third term : Draughting, cutting and fitting thin 
dresses. 

Second Year — First term : Fine machine sewing ; mak- 
ing of children's clothes. Second term : Making thick 
dresses. Third term : Fancy work. 

The cooking-room is equipped with a full set of dishes, 
utensils, etc., and has a new steel range. Each pupil has 
a separate section of the cooking bench, with mixing 
board, drawer for utensils, sliding seat, etc. 

The course in Cooking is also a two years' course. The 
instruction of the first year includes the fundamental prin- 
ciples of cooking and their application by each pupil in the 
preparation of simple dishes. Especial attention is given 
to the cost, composition and dietetic value of foods. The 
pupil thus acquires a scientific knowledge of the hygiene 
of food. 

In the second year of the course the principles learned 
in the preceding year are elaborated and more fully ex- 
emplified. There are added courses in Fancy Cookery and 
in Invalid Cookery. Special instruction is given in the 
serving of meals and in the care of the dining-room. 

From two to four hours of actual work in the kitchen is 
required of every pupil. 

Students of the Institute are not charged for instruction 
or material, in either the sewing or the cooking classes, 
with the exception of the material used for making gar- 
ments. Each student makes these garments for her own 
use. 



24 THE S. P. I,EES COU,EGlATE INSTITUTE. 



THE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 

Thanks to the generosity of Mrs. N. F. McCormick, the 
Institute had the honor this session of giving to Jack- 
son its first electric light. The brilliancy of the pow- 
erful arc light in front of the building has attracted much 
attention, and its silent testimony will, it is hoped, lead to 
the establishment of a plant for lighting the whole town. 
The dynamo, intended primarily for lighting the Manual 
Training shop on the dark afternoons of winter, is used 
also for lights in the Institute building and in the cooking- 
room of the Domestic Science department. The large 
girls' dormitory is also equipped throughout with lamps 
for electric lighting. 

It is evident that a great step in the direction of modern 
equipment has thus been taken. 



BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

This department, occupying two dormitories, is in 
charge of Miss Mary P. Irvine, whose part in the success 
of the school is well known. The girls' room is in the larger 
dormitory, "Little Hall," so named in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. J. Little. This building is roomy, convenient and 
architecturally pleasing. The rooms are of ample size, 
well lighted and heated by hot air. They are comfortably 
furnished by churches in various parts of the State. Mem- 
bers of the Faculty also have rooms in the Hall. 

The " Steele Cottage," named in memory of two sons 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Steele, of Jessamine county, is used 
for the young men and boys, and is in charge of one of the 
professors. 

Both halls are under the management of Miss Irvine, 
and students and teachers have their meals together as one 
family. The influence is that of a Christian home. Those 




A SEWING Civ ASS. 




PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 




OLDEST HOUSE IN JACKSON. 



26 THE S- P. I.EES COW,EGlATE INSTITUTE- 

who persist in refractory or disorderly conduct are not 
retained as boarders. 

The charge for room, board, heat and light is $2.00 a 
week. 

THE McCORMICK CHAPEL AND FREE SCHOOL. 

The McCormick Chapel, in a part of Jackson separated 
from the main body of the town by the river, and occupied 
chiefly by a mining population, was dedicated this session. 
At the same time there was opened a free day school for the 
benefit of those unable to attend the Institute. The chapel 
is used for this school as well as for Sunday-school and 
other religious services. The instruction is in charge of 
Miss Minnie L,. Day, who has efficient assistance, and in- 
cludes an elementary course in Domestic Science. The 
aim is to give thorough grounding in the elements of a 
common school education. It is expected that this school, 
by fostering an educational ambition in a part of the town 
not otherwise so reached, will increase the desire for the 
more advanced work of the Institute. 

THE S. P. LEES COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. 

Action of the Synod of Kentucky, Taken October 

19, 1899. 

In connection with its educational work, the Synod of 
Kentucky, in session at Danville in October, 1899, desires 
to place on record an earnest expression of its deep appre- 
ciation of the valuable assistance, in various ways through 
several years past, rendered to this work by Mrs. S. P. 
Lees, of New York, and Mrs. N. F. McCormick, of Chi- 
cago; and, in doing so, to make grateful recognition of the 
deep interest they have shown, and of the large and useful 
gifts they have made for this most important branch of the 
Synod's work, especially at Jackson, Ky. 

The Synod not only thanks most sincerely and heartily 
these noble and generous friends of its work, but it also 



28 THE S. P. IvEES COI,I«EGIATE INSTITUTE. 

earnestly prays that God's best blessings may continue to 
rest upon them, and that they may long be spared in health 
and happiness to advance the cause of Christ and Chris- 
tian education in our country, and that in the end they 
may have an abundant entrance into the everlasting king- 
dom of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. 

The Synod also instructs the stated clerk to communi- 
cate this action to Mrs. McCormick and Mrs. Lees, accom- 
panying it in each case with an appropriate personal letter. 



MEDALS. 

On Washington's birthday the following gold medals 
are awarded : 

i. To the young gentleman making the best declama- 
tion. (W- T. Grant.) 

2. To the young lady giving the best recitation. (J. K. 
Lemon.) 

At the close of the session the following additional gold 
medals are awarded : 

i. To the student standing highest in second-year 
Latin. (W. T. Beckner.) 

2. To the student standing highest in Bible. (J. H. 
Moore.) 

3. To the student standing highest in examination on 
common school branches. (John C. Day.) 

4. To the young gentleman making the best debate. 
(W. N. Haldeman.) 

5. To the young lady giving the best reading. (The 
Chancellor.) 

LIBRARY. 

In connection with the Institute there is a library and 
reading-room, to which the students have free access. The 
library has a nucleus of excellent works of reference, but 
needs greatly additional volumes for general reading. 




A COOKING CIvASS. 



30 nun s. *. inns coiahgiat a msTx*u*8. 

Small additions are made from time to time through ths 
kindness of friends. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There is in connection with the Institute the Periclean 
Debating Society. All students above the Intermediate 
grade are eligible for membership. The society is pre- 
sided over by one of its members, and is under the super- 
vision of the Faculty. During the session public contests 
are held for public decision, and medals are offered for 
excellence in the various literary exercises. During the 
present session the membership has been nearly thirty. 



tttti S. P. ttfES CottECJlATli ItfSflfLW ^t 



EXPENSES. 

The Session is divided into three terms, beginning Sep- 
tember 4, December 4, and March 5. All fees are payable 
in advance. Expenses are as follows : 

PRIMARY. 

September to end of Session $10 00 

January to end of Session 6 00 

Per term 4 00 

INTERMEDIATE. 

September to end of Session . {15 00 

January to eud of Session 9 00 

Per term 6 00 

COLLEGIATE. 

September to end of Session $20 00 

January to end of Session 1200 

Per term 8 00 

NORMAL. 

January to end of Session #15 00 

BUSINESS. 

Typewriting $800 

Stenography 30 00 

MUSIC. 

September to end of Session $25 00 

Jauuary to end of Session 15 00 

Per term 10 00 

BOARD. 

Per week $2 00 

For further information apply to 

S. P. IvEES COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, 

Jackson, Ky. 
L. H. BLANTON, D. D., Chancellor, 

Richmond, Ky. 




"UNCIvE" BEN BIGvSTAFF, 

1861-65 John Morgan Scout ; 1892-1900 Mountain Evangelist.